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KLEZCALIFORNIA 2003

Course Descriptions | Daily Schedule

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS

Due to security requirements, all participants in KlezCalifornia 2003 must register in advance. This includes those who wish to attend one course, one day, or an evening program. Due to limited spaces and security, there will be no non-registrants or drop-ins. Please call if you have questions.

NOTE: Courses and activities of special interest to non-musicians are titled in Blue. Music courses are in Red.

SUNDAY, JUNE 22

  • 3:00 - 6:00 Registration

  • 6:30 - 7:30 Welcome to KlezCalifornia. Greetings and introductions to program administrators and staff who will explain the many exciting activities of the week. All

After this presentation, participants should choose either:

  • 7:30 - 10:00 Introduction to the Music Program. Music staff will meet, audition, screen, and assign music class participants. If you're not sure what class to take, or what level is appropriate, here's where we'll work that out. After that's done, time permitting, sing and/or jam with staff. Music staff; OR

  • 7:30 - 10:00 "From Avenue A to the Great White Way," Henry Sapoznik. In a musical romp through 20th century American music, you'll learn about the intertwined history of Yiddish theater and Broadway. You'll never hear show tunes the same way again!


DAILY MONDAY THROUGH THURSDAY

9:00 - 10:45 AM * FIRST PERIOD

  • Rhythm and Jews. Musician, singer, and dancer Michael Alpert and bassist Stu Brotman will conduct a workshop for all instruments, all levels, on how to make klezmer rhythm cook while letting the melody breathe. Emphasis on major dance genres.

  • Beginning Yiddish Language, Harvey Varga. An introduction to reading, writing and conversation. No previous knowledge of Yiddish required.

  • Yiddish Short Stories from Mendele to I.B. Singer, Naomi Seidman. This course will provide a brief overview of the "Classic" writers of Yiddish literature through a reading of a number of short stories, which will be provided both in Yiddish and in English translation. We will begin with "Shem and Japheth on the Wagon" by Mendele Mokher Seforim, the "Grandfather of Yiddish Literature," continue with a selection from The Railroad Stories by Sholem Aleichem, and move on to "If Not Higher" by Y.L. Peretz. We will end with a close reading of "Gimpel the Fool," the first of Isaac Bashevis Singer's stories to appear in English translation.
    (NOTE: Yiddish culture courses, except for Yiddish Language classes, will be in English.)

  • Children's program, Gerry Tenney and other staff. KlezCalifornia will include a full-time program for children ages 5 - 11. The children will be divided both by age and by interest. Children will be encouraged to participate in a variety of activities, including music (both singing and instrumental), Yiddish language, drama, dance, and traditional arts and crafts. Special arts & crafts programs will be led by artists Claire Sherman and Nancy Katz. The amount of time spent at each activity will be less than for the adult classes. There will also be recess periods so that children can either run around or just chill out. Older kids may choose to take music classes with adults, depending on their musical level. All staff will be experienced working with children in a Jewish setting and preferably have a knowledge of Yiddish culture and history. They will be assisted by work-study registrants and by parents, who are asked to spend one course period a day with the children's program.

11:00 AM -12:45 PM * SECOND PERIOD

  • Instrumental Instruction. Students will develop technically and stylistically on their instruments at their level. Students are encouraged to take advantage of the presence of these fine artists by visiting more than one class, to be exposed to the wealth of interpretive skills.

    • Clarinet & other wind instruments, Kurt Bjorling "Learning how to learn." Open to wind instrument (clarinets, saxophones, recorders, etc...) players of all levels, a class to explore sources of klezmer music and ways to use them to develop interpretations and performance skills.

    • Violin & Strings, Deborah Strauss. Open to violinists and string players of all levels. We will focus on the style, rhythm and phrasing of traditional Eastern European Jewish violin. Be prepared to sing, dance, and do some work outside of class. Cassette resource tapes will be distributed. In addition, all students are encouraged to record each class, so please bring a cassette player/recorder.

    • Brass Master Course, Frank London. Bring in a piece to work on and receive expert coaching in matters of technique and interpretation from respected brass clinician and Klezmatics trumpeter.

    • The Bottom Line, Stu Brotman. Bass line construction for bass instruments. An opportunity to develop ensemble skills by following a melody player through dance styles including hora and bulgar, and ritual and listening music, such as kale bazetsens and doinas. Guitars welcome.

    • Beginning Orchestra, Peter Jaques. Beginning musicians of all ages, including children who play instruments, will learn the elements of klezmer music.

    • Yiddish Vocal Style and Interpretation, Adrienne Cooper. For singers who want to apply their technique (cabaret/theater, classical, folk, jazz) to Yiddish singing . Bring in a Yiddish song (folk, art, theater, liturgical) and receive expert individual coaching of your performance -- emphasis on style, language, interpretation, and translation as an element of performance.

  • Intermediate Yiddish Language, Harvey Varga. For those with basic conversation and comprehension skills.

  • Yiddish Radio, Henry Sapoznik. "The Yiddish Radio Project," an exuberant celebration of memory, history, and nostalgia, broadcast on a 10-part NPR series, has won the Peabody Award for Excellence in Electronic Journalism, the most selective and distinguished award in broadcasting. Join Henry as he plays and talks about Yiddish radio!

  • Mameloshn: Language and Gender in Ashkenaz, Naomi Seidman. This course will explore the interrelationships between language and gender in Ashkenaz, focusing particularly on the ways that Yiddish (mameloshn) was considered a feminine language and Hebrew (loshn koydesh) a masculine one. We will begin with an exploration of Yiddish "women's literature," that is, the tkhines (supplicatory prayers) and Bible translations for women that were published beginning in the seventeenth century. We will then move on to a study of the gendered rhetoric of the Hebrew-Yiddish "language wars," focusing in particular on the cartoons published in the Yiddish press on the language question.

  • Children's program, Gerry Tenney and other staff (see information above)

12:45-2:15 PM * LUNCH

  • Kosher lunches with vegetarian, pareve, and dairy choices will be provided Monday through Thursday

2:15 - 3:45 PM * THIRD PERIOD

  • Dance Course with Dance Accompaniment Band. Michael Alpert will teach Eastern European Jewish dances. Kurt Bjorling will teach a small Dance Ensemble to play for dancing. Musicians will be pre-selected.

  • Ensembles:

    • Fidl-Kapelye, Deborah Strauss. For all bowed string instruments (violins, violas, 'cellos, basses) and tsimbl. We will focus on learning music by ear and playing in a fluid, dynamic and interactive way. Singers also welcome.

    • From Nigunim to New Jewish Music, Frank London. Workshop in traditional and innovative klezmer styles, including exploration of religious and para-religious melody as sources for improvisation and new composition.

    • Rhythm Section, Stu Brotman

    • Creative Interpretation and Arranging for Singers and Instrumentalists, Jeff Warschauer. Are you a singer who works with instrumentalists, or an instrumentalist who works with singers? We'll work on developing a deeper understanding of both the klezmer instrumental tradition and the Yiddish and Loshn-Koydesh song tradition. The goal is to help you make more creative, intelligent and informed interpretation and arranging choices. For intermediate and advanced participants.

    • Chorus: Repertoire for Community Singing, Adrienne Cooper. Yiddish folk song developed as a social phenomenon -- to be sung in community settings, from the family circle to the picket line, from the union hall to the communal seder table. We will focus on a usable repertoire relevant to contemporary life -- the holiday cycle, songs of peace and liberation, building accessible arrangements for group singing.

  • Instrumental Instruction: Accordion, Jim Rebhan

  • Advanced Yiddish Language, Michael Wex. Come at least one step closer to speaking Yiddish as if you can't speak anything else. We'll use written material as a springboard for conversation and discussion, with an emphasis on idiomatic depth. And when the going gets tough, the tough will speak Yiddish. Participants must be able to read.

  • Papercutting, Claire Sherman. Come learn the Jewish folk art of papercutting. The amazing thing about papercutting is that you can create beautiful art work even if you don’t know how to draw, or “can’t draw a straight line.” In this class we will cut with x-acto knives and scissors, learn to make royslekh, (circular or rose shaped paper window decorations for the holiday of Shavuot), and other papercuts with one or more folds. We will also delve into micrography, the Jewish folk art of creating pictures or patterns entirely of tiny words.

  • Children's program, Gerry Tenney and other staff (see information above)

4:00 - 5:30 PM * FOURTH PERIOD

  • Mentored Jam Sessions:

    • SLO-JAM will enable beginning and intermediate students to learn traditional melodies in a nurturing environment, staff

    • INTERMEDIATE JAM is an opportunity to play a large repertoire in a variety of styles, staff

    • PRO JAM will allow the staff and students to play together in various combinations, with an emphasis on interpretation, staff

    • DANCE ORCHESTRA will help students develop ensemble skills necessary for dance accompaniment, Kurt Bjorling

  • The Enchanted Journey: Yiddishland in Song, Adrienne Cooper. Yiddish songs contain a world of cultural detail -- the sights and sounds of a shtetl home, a tramway in a bustling city, the remembered taste of regional food, love lost in a darkly recalled railway station. Learn to sing your way across the map of Yiddishland. A participatory workshop with explanations of the social, linguistic and historical contexts of the songs. The song book will contain all songs in Yiddish, transliterations, and English.

  • Jewish Music from Old World to Our World, Henry Sapoznik. The history of Yiddish instrumental music from its humble origins in Eastern Europe to today's international klezmer renewal, as manifested in concert and on compact discs, film and tv. Expect lively, colorful discussion interspersed with rare recordings from the last hundred years. Laced with irreverent and pun-infested wit, this course is an excellent primer for both the new klezmer fan and the seasoned music professional.

  • Wexology, Michael Wex. A lighthearted but completely accurate look at how Yiddish came to be as weird as it is, Wexology will alter your view of the language forever. No knowledge of Yiddish or anything else required.

  • Children's program, Gerry Tenney and other staff (see information above)

5:30 - 7:30 PM * DINNER BREAK

7:30 - 10:00 PM * EVENING PROGRAM

  • h3: Staff Concert. Enjoy a wild and wonderful evening of the best klezmer music of this generation, performed by KlezCalifornia's teachers. Tell your friends -- and have them sign up at least several days in advance! Sorry, no drop-ins to this or any other program.
  • Tuesday: Song and Dance Evening. Sing-along with Yiddish song leader Adrienne Cooper (no Yiddish knowledge required), followed by a dance party with Michael Alpert and a live band. Easy dances -- no special skills needed, just two feet and a willing heart!
  • [Wednesday: FREE]
  • Thursday: Student Concert. Enjoy the music of KlezCalifornia's participants! This is the night when your family and friends can see what you've learned.

FRIDAY, JUNE 27

9:00 - 11:00 AM

  • "The Future of Klezmer" Music staff with special guests Ben Goldberg and Kevin Mummey will talk about future directions for klezmer music. Discussion may break out into playing!

  • "A Home on the Range: The Jewish Chicken Ranchers of Petaluma," a documentary film by Bonnie Burt and Judith Montell. Jack London, California vigilantes, McCarthyism, the Cold War and agribusiness all come to life in this quintessentially American story of how a group of immigrants find their new home, a home on the range. Meet this fractious, idealistic, intrepid group of Eastern European Jews and their descendants as they confront obstacles of language and culture on their journey towards becoming Americans.

  • Children's program, Gerry Tenney and other staff (see information above)

11:15 AM - 12:45 PM

  • Music Master Class with Ben Goldberg. A leading voice in avant-garde Jewish composition and improvisation will discuss methods for understanding and expanding the implications of klezmer harmony and developing a personal approach to polyharmonic improvisation.

  • Music Master Class with Kevin Mummey. Virtuoso percussionist will demonstrate approaches to klezmer percussion on the drum set and a variety of ethnic hand drums.

  • "So Far and Yet So Near." Michael Alpert, musician and ethnographer, talks about his trip with Harvey Varga to Rumania and the Ukraine in 2002, showing videos and playing recordings of non-Jews playing and singing music that will sound completely familiar.

12:45 - 1:30 PM

  • Farbrengen --   We'll come together to raise a glass (of juice), sing a few Yiddish "good bye" songs, and celebrate the completion of our first annual KlezCalifornia. We'll also give folks a chance to express how it all went, and suggest ideas for coming years.


2003 DAILY SCHEDULE

NOTE: Courses and activities of special interest to non-musicians are titled in Blue. Music courses are in Red. Locations are (Bold)

Please check bulletin board in lobby area for changes and special events!!

 

SUNDAY, JUNE 22

  • 3:00 - 6:00 PM Registration

  • 6:30 - 7:30 PM Greetings & Staff Introductions (Student Commons)

  • 7:30 - 10:00 PM Introduction to Music Program, Music staff (Student Commons)

  • 7:30 - 10:00 PM "From Avenue A to the Great White Way," Henry Sapoznik (Room 213)

DAILY CLASS SCHEDULE (h3 - THURSDAY)

9:00-10:45 AM * FIRST PERIOD

  • Rhythm & Jews, Michael Alpert & Stu Brotman (Student Commons)

  • Beginning Yiddish Language, Harvey Varga (Room 212)

  • Yiddish Short Stories from Mendele to I.B. Singer, Naomi Seidman (Room 224)

  • Children's program, Gerry Tenney and other staff (Room 225)

11:00 AM -12:45 PM * SECOND PERIOD

  • Instrumental Instruction:

    • Clarinet & Woodwinds, Kurt Bjorling (Room 223)

    • Violin & Fidl-Kapelye, Deborah Strauss (Room 225)

    • Brass Master Class, Frank London (Room 213)

    • The Bottom Line & Rhythm Section, Stu Brotman (Room 205)

    • Beginning Orchestra, Peter Jaques (Student Commons)

    • Yiddish Vocal Style and Interpretation, Adrienne Cooper (Music Room)

  • IntermediateYiddish Language, Harvey Varga (Room 212)

  • Yiddish Radio, Henry Sapoznik (Room 208)

  • Mameloshn: Language and Gender in Ashkenaz, Naomi Seidman (Room 224)

  • Children's program, Gerry Tenney & other staff (Room ---)

12:45-2:15 PM * LUNCH

  • Kosher lunches with vegetarian, pareve, and dairy choices will be provided h3 through Thursday (Student Commons)

2:15-3:45 PM * THIRD PERIOD

  • Dance Course with Dance Accompaniment Band, Michael Alpert & Kurt Bjorling (Student Commons)

  • Ensemble Courses:

    • From Nigunim to New Jewish Music, Frank London (Room 213)

    • Creative Interpretation and Arranging for Singers and Instrumentalists, Jeff Warschauer (Room 224)

    • Chorus: Repertoire for Community Singing, Adrienne Cooper (Music Room)

    • Instrumental Instruction: Accordion, Jim Rebhan (Room 208)

  • Advanced Yiddish Language, Michael Wex (Room 212)

  • Paper Cutting, Claire Sherman (Room 223)

  • Children's program, Gerry Tenney & other staff (Room 225)

4:00-5:30 PM * FOURTH PERIOD

  • Mentored Jam Sessions:

    • Slow-Jam, staff (Room 204)

    • Intermediate Jam, staff (Room 224)

    • Pro Jam, staff (Student Commons)

    • The Enchanted Journey: Yiddishland in Song, Adrienne Cooper (Music Room)

    • Plucked and Quiet Instruments, Jeff Warschauer (Room 213)

  • Jewish Music from Old World to Our World, Henry Sapoznik (Room 208)

  • Wexology: A humorous look at Yiddish phrases and idioms, Michael Wex (Room 212)

  • Children's program, Gerry Tenney & other staff (Room 225)

5:30-7:30 PM *DINNER BREAK

7:30-10:00 PM * EVENING PROGRAM

  • h3: Staff Concert (Concert Hall)
  • TUESDAY: Song and Dance Evening, Adrienne Cooper, Michael Alpert & band (Student Commons)
  • WEDNESDAY: (Free)
  • THURSDAY: Student Concert (Student Commons)

FRIDAY, JUNE 27 (LAST DAY)

9:00-11:00 AM

  • Discussion: "The Future of Klezmer," Music staff with special guests Ben Goldberg & Kevin Mummey (Student Commons)

  • Film: "A Home on the Range: The Jewish Chicken Ranchers of Petaluma" (Room 213)

  • Children's program, Gerry Tenney & other staff (Room 225)

11:15-12:45

  • Music Master Class with Ben Goldberg: Klezmer harmony and polyharmonic improvisation. (Room 223)

  • Music Master Class with Kevin Mummey: Klezmer percussion (Student Commons)

  • "So Far and Yet So Near." Michael Alpert, musician and ethnographer, talks about his 2002 trip with Harvey Varga to Rumania and the Ukraine (Room 213)

12:45 - 1:30 PM

  • Farbrengen --  We'll come together to raise a glass (of juice), sing a few Yiddish "good-bye" songs, and celebrate the completion of our first annual KlezCalifornia. We'll also give folks a chance to express how it all went, and suggest ideas for coming years. (Student Commons)