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Session 1 — 11:00am-12:30pm

Reminder:  Daylight Savings Time ends Saturday night.

It's fine to change workshops; keep your ticket with you.
Everyone is welcome to watch and listen to any workshop; you will have a great time!
All instrumental workshops require at least an intermediate level on your instrument, even if you are a klezmer beginner.

  • INSTRUMENTAL: Klezmer 101, The tricks, trills, slides, and beats to making them dance — Cookie Segelstein

The under-the-hood foundation and techniques of klezmer playing. Cookie will discuss and show the basics of how to get the Jewish sound, how to make people dance through the melody alone. Everyone will come away with a basic knowledge of what is needed to develop further into a klezmer musician Not just for klezmer beginners. All levels welcome.
  • INSTRUMENTAL: The Dirty Klezmer Secrets of Dave Tarras and Naftule Brandwein, a workshop for all instruments — Joel Rubin

Learn from the stylings and repertoire of the great immigrant clarinetists Dave Tarras and Naftule Brandwein not as an end goal, but rather as an inspiration to develop and extend their techniques for all instruments towards a klezmer music of the 21st century. Mainly will be taught by ear. We suggest you bring a recording device.
  • DANCING: Klezmer Dancing Steps and Styles — Bruce Bierman, with music by Jim Rebhan

Come learn the dances traditionally associated with klezmer instrumental music. Freylekhs, shers, zhoks, khosidls are some of the famous klezmer tune-types that are also Yiddish dances. Joyous and expressive, communal and individualistic, klezmer dances give us an extraordinary window into all of Yiddish culture. But klezmer dance is by no means a museum piece. Creative, improvisational and just plain fun, it's a great way to express yourself! This workshop will have a special focus on klezmer dance style, with special tips on how to be a leader. No specific dance knowledge needed. All are welcome.
  • POETRY: Golem as a Poem: A Being of Letters — Jake Marmer

According to the legend, the Golem is a phantasmagoric being brought into the world through the power of words. Is it human? Is it a spirit? Or is it a text? We'll read ancient and contemporary riffs on the Golem legend, and attempt to write a Golem-summoning poem of our own.
  • LECTURE/DEMO: Musical Creationists & The Mystery of Improvisation — Joshua Horowitz & Stu Brotman

Find out things that performers don’t want the audience to know. Stu and Josh will give a rare inside view of what is really happening when musicians improvise and create music from “nothing.” They will show how performers prepare for uncharted situations and dispel the myths surrounding improvisation. Whether you are usually a performer or audience member, you will learn what it takes to make music off the deep end.
  • SING/ACT/DANCE/DRAW: How does the Tsar Drink Tea? (part 1), for kids 6-12 and their families — Gerry Tenney

Participate in and perform a production of the extremely funny musical one-act play, based on the Yiddish folk song Vi Azoy Trinkt Der Keyser Tey? (How Does The Tzar Drink Tea?) Written by workshop leader, Gerry Tenney, it takes place at Khanikeh (Hanukkah) time, with a young boy running away from the Tsar’s Army. The dialogue is mostly in English, and the songs are mostly in Yiddish. We need singers, musicians, actors, dancers, scenery makers, and more. You are welcome to participate in one or both workshops (am and pm) and to watch the play at 5:00pm. No memorization necessary. For the whole family. Get a real taste of Yiddish culture!



Session 2 — 3:15pm-4:45pm

It's fine to change workshops; keep your ticket with you.
Everyone is welcome to watch and listen to any workshop; you will have a great time!
All instrumental workshops require at least an intermediate level on your instrument, even if you are a klezmer beginner.


  • INSTRUMENTAL: Hidden Tunes, the Repertoire of Moshe Beregovski — Joel Rubin

This class will concentrate on how to work with klezmer and other materials collected in Russia and the former Soviet Union in the early years of the 20th century. The tunes come to us as simple, single melody lines, mostly without ornamentation and all without harmonization or arrangements. How do we bring them to life? How do we adapt them for our instruments? Will be taught mainly by ear. We suggest you bring a recording device.
  • INSTRUMENTAL: Klezmer Dance Band, for all instruments — Cookie Segelstein (melody), Joshua Horowitz & Stu Brotman (accompaniment)

Klezmer Dance Band will focus on learning the important klezmer dance genres such as freylekhs, shers, zhoks, khosidls and bulgars. With ear learning, signals and movement, we will learn to communicate with each other and with the dancers in order to make the music-dance relationship interactive, groovy, and very, very exciting. Then we will put it all into practice at the Festival Finale, where we’ll all play and jam with Joel Rubin and Veretski Pass! Bring instruments! Everyone will start together, then break into melody and accompaniment instruments.
  • SINGING: Zingeray, at which individuals take turns presenting a Yiddish song — Jeanette Lewicki

Zingeray (pronounced “zinger-eye") means “a singing-type thing" or song circle. A zingeray is like a party where, instead of swapping jokes, folks take turns singing songs (or listen to them). Just like jokes, one leads to another; some are new to you and some you've heard before; some are profound, some are silly, some are just sad. Some you don't get at all until years later, maybe. We'll probably sit in a circle, without microphones or instruments, and share Yiddish songs.
  • LITERATURE: The Irritating Jewish Voice in Sholem Aleichem’s Stories — Gabriella Safran

Sholem Aleichem's characters are all talkative.  Some are a pleasure to listen to, and others less so.  We will read (in English) some Sholem Aleichem stories featuring particularly annoying characters and consider why they have so much power over us.
  • SING/ACT/DANCE/DRAW: How does the Tsar Drink Tea? (part 2), for kids 6-12 and their families — Gerry Tenney

Continuation from Workshops Session 1 (see above). You are welcome to participate in one or both workshops (am and pm) and to watch the play at 5:00pm.